Younger patients with remitted primary anterior uveitis are at a higher risk of relapsing

October 27, 2011

Young adults with remitted primary anterior uveitis pose a higher risk of relapsing than middle-aged adults.

Young adults with remitted primary anterior uveitis pose a higher risk of relapsing than middle-aged adults, according to an investigation featured in Ophthalmology.

Dr John H. Kempen et al., Department of Ophthalmology, The University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, compiled at retrospective cohort study on 102 anterior uveitis patients. Each patient achieved remission during the primary episode of anterior uveitis within 90 days of diagnosis. Information was obtained via a standardized chart review and the main outcome measures included time to relapse of anterior uveitis and the risk factors contributing towards relapse.

The findings demonstrated a recurrence of anterior uveitis in 40 patients and a relapse incidence in 24% per patient, per year. Of the patients studied, 61% remained in remission at 1.5 years after remission.

A ratio of 18 to 35 year old patients vs. 35 to 55 year old patients revealed that younger adults presented with a significantly higher relapse risk than middle-aged adults.

The study suggests an explicit plan should be formulated for detecting and managing relapses in patients with primary anterior uveitis.