Toric IOLs reduce astigmatism more than PCRIs

March 12, 2014

Both toric IOLs and peripheral corneal relaxing incisions (PCRIs) reduce astigmatism, but toric IOLs do so to a greater extent as well as being more predictable, according to results of a recently published study.

Both toric IOLs and peripheral corneal relaxing incisions (PCRIs) reduce astigmatism, but toric IOLs do so to a greater extent as well as being more predictable, according to results of a study recently published in the Journal of Cataract & Refractive Surgery.

For this prospective masked bilateral randomized study, researchers from Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, enrolled 30 patients (60 eyes) with a preoperative corneal astigmatism of 1.0 to 2.5 D. All patients received a toric IOL in one eye and nontoric IOL plus PCRI in the other eye. Postoperative follow-up was done at 1 hour, 1 month and 6 months to measure uncorrected distance visual acuity, corrected distance visual acuity, autorefraction and subjective refraction. The IOL axis was assessed with retroillumination photos.

Researchers found a statistically significant difference in the mean astigmatism vector reduction in the toric IOL group compared with the PCRI group (1.74 D vs 1.27 D, respectively; P = 0.042). Mean absolute rotation of the toric IOL was 2.5 degrees (maximum 6.3 degrees) in the first 6 months postoperatively. Astigmatism increased in the PCRI group between the 1-month and the 6-month follow-up (mean: 0.38 D; maximum: 1.00 D; P

To view the abstract of this study, click here.