Study released comparing travoprost and latanoprost

November 30, 2010

Patients suffering from primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) or ocular hypertension have been shown to respond better to travoprost than latanoprost according to a recent study.

Patients suffering from primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) or ocular hypertension have been shown to respond better to travoprost than latanoprost according to data published in Clinical Ophthalmology.

The study by Dr Michael Miyashiro of Ludwig Ophthalmology Centre, Hilo, USA, et al. examined the efficacy, tolerability and safety of travoprost 0.004% BAK-free in 20 Japanese patients with POAG or ocular hypertension living in the US who had previously used latanoprost 0.005%. Each patient was transferred from latanoprost monotherapy to travoprost monotherapy for 12 weeks. They were all given the same series of tests to evaluate the efficacy, safety and tolerability of latanoprost during the initial visit and then of travoprost BAK-free during the final visit.

It was found that there was no significant difference in the patients' IOP levels, mean ocular hyperaemia, visual acuity, corneal fluoroscein staining or overall scores from the Ocular Surface Disease Index when using either therapy. However, it was noted that patients had a shorter mean tear break-up time on latanoprost. Additionally, more patients preferred the travoprost BAK-free monotherapy in comparison to latanoprost.

Based on the results it was suggested that the Japanese-American patients transitioned from latanoprost to travoprost BAK-free can expect to gain similar IOP control and some improvement in anterior segment signs with both treatments but the patient preference was towards travoprost at a ratio of 2:1.