PKP commonly results in glaucoma

March 31, 2007

Glaucoma is a serious complication following transplantation, with about 50% of eyes requiring further surgery. According to Justyna Izdebska and colleagues from the Medical University of Warsaw, Poland, trabeculectomy seems to be the most effective surgical treatment.

Glaucoma is a serious complication following transplantation, with about 50% of eyes requiring further surgery. According to Justyna Izdebska and colleagues from the Medical University of Warsaw, Poland, trabeculectomy seems to be the most effective surgical treatment.

The data of 718 patients undergoing penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) in one centre between January 2002 and June 2006, were analysed. Post-keratoplasty glaucoma was defined as an increase of IOP above 21 mmHg lasting for at least three months.

Sixty-five patients (9%) were diagnosed with glaucoma before undergoing PKP. Twenty-one eyes were treated with medical therapy and 44 eyes underwent glaucoma surgery before PKP. A total of 137 patients (19%) who underwent PKP, developed glaucoma postoperatively. Medical therapy failed in 45% of cases necessitating further surgery (trabeculectomy, transscleral cyclophotocoagulation, cyklocrio and shunt procedures).

The authors of this study believe that trabeculectomy is the most appropriate way to treat glaucoma resulting from PK.