Patient age affects VA in multifocal IOL wearers

August 20, 2013

Visual acuities and contrast sensitivity are worse in older patients than younger patients after implantation of diffractive multifocal IOLs, claims a paper.

Visual acuities and contrast sensitivity are worse in older patients than younger patients after implantation of diffractive multifocal IOLs, claims a paper.

A team managed by Dr Mami Yoshino, Department of Ophthalmology, Tokyo Dental College Suidobashi Hospital, Tokyo, Japan, devised a cross-sectional study on eyes receiving a diffractive multifocal IOL after cataract extraction. Patients were divided into five age decades: 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s and 70s. Outcome measures included corrected distance (CDVA), distance-corrected near (DCNVA) and corrected near (CNVA) visual acuities.

All visual acuities were compared between the age groups one month postoperatively. Eyes implanted with monofocal IOLs were the controls and contrast sensitivity was assessed at three months.

Mean CDVA was significantly better in the 30s and 50, compared to the 60s and 70s. DCMVA significantly declined in the 60s and 70s, compared to the 30s age group.

CNVA was better in the 30s, compared to 50s, 60s and 70s and better in the 40s than in the 60s and 70s. There was no change in the CDVA with the monofocal IOL. Contrast sensitivity was significantly higher in the 30s than in the 60s and 70s at 6 cycles per degree and in the 50s to 70s at 18 cycles per degree.

Overall, visual acuities with the monofocal IOL were not linked with patient age, but visual acuities were significantly linked to age with the multifocal IOL.

The abstract can be seen in the Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery.