Optic nerve regeneration

Article

Scientists from the Children's Hospital Boston, USA have revealed their achievement of the greatest regeneration to date in the mammalian optic nerve.

Scientists from the Children's Hospital Boston, USA have revealed their achievement of the greatest regeneration to date in the mammalian optic nerve, which could lead them to potentially be able to restore function after vision loss caused by optic nerve damage.

The scientists have discovered that two molecular pathways, that each promotes some optic nerve regeneration on their own, can work synergistically. Through the simultaneous activation of these pathways in a mouse model there was a 10-fold increase in the regeneration in comparison with results obtained of either pathway alone.

Dr Larry Benowitz, a member of the Neurobiology and Neurosurgery Departments at Children's and a professor of Surgery and Ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School, commented: "This is a really massive change. It brings us closer to potentially restoring function after vision loss caused by optic nerve damage."

For more detailed information visit the website www.childrenshospital.org

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