Nonmydriatic imaging useful in diabetic children

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Ophthalmologists may use nonmydriatic retinal imaging to supplement the standard clinical exam to screen diabetic children aged as young as 2 years, according to newly published research.

Ophthalmologists may use nonmydriatic retinal imaging to supplement the standard clinical exam to screen diabetic children aged as young as 2 years, according to newly published research.

US researchers conducted a prospective study of 106 children with type 1 diabetes who were aged 2 to 17 years. The study included an intake form; blood pressure, pulse and oximetry measurements; visual acuity assessment (Simav, Padova) and nonmydriatic colour imaging (CX-1 45° 15.1 megapixel camera, Canon). They assessed images for indications of diabetic retinopathy, and two clinicians graded image quality on a scale of 1 to 5.

Ninety-eight percent of the children underwent imaging. One was found to have nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy, and findings for 2 were incidental.

Sixty-two percent of the children had had an eye exam within the past year, with exams significantly more likely among older children and those who had had type 1 diabetes for more than 5 years.

Investigators graded images as high quality in 178 (86%) eyes, and they said images of some clinical value were obtained in 207 (99.5%) eyes.

The researchers shared their results in the Journal of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus.

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