No strategy for pregnant women with glaucoma

April 5, 2007

The results of a questionnaire sent out to consultant ophthalmologists in the UK, has discovered that there is no one strategy in place for the management of glaucoma in pregnant women.

The results of a questionnaire sent out to consultant ophthalmologists in the UK, has discovered that there is no one strategy in place for the management of glaucoma in pregnant women.

Daniela Vaideanu and Scott Fraser from the Sunderland Eye Infirmary, Tyne and Wear, UK sent out a questionnaire to all consultant ophthalmologists in the UK asking whether they had previous experience of treating pregnant women with glaucoma. If the respondents replied that they had, they were also asked what management they had used, what management they would currently employ and, if they were to use medical treatment, what would be their first choice agent.

Of the 605 questionnaires sent out, 282 were returned. Of the respondents, 26% had previously treated pregnant women with glaucoma. Most (71%) had continued with the therapy that the women were already on. In total, 34%, on observing the situation, decided not to treat. When asked what they would currently do in this scenario, 31% responded that they were unsure and 40% replied that they would continue the current treatment. A total of 45% of respondents said that they would use beta-blockers, should medical treatment be required, whereas 33% said they would use prostaglandins.

On review of the data, the researchers concluded that, although more than a quarter of ophthalmologists have come across the situation, there is currently no optimal strategy in place for dealing with it. They suggest that guidelines be produced based on current knowledge and modified as new evidence appears.