NICE makes implant available for patients with DME

Article

Patients with pseudophakic eye who have undergone cataract will have greater access to fluocinolone acetonide (Iluvien, Alimera Sciences) for the treatment of chronic diabetic macular oedema (DME) that is considered refractive to available therapies. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has published a final guidance recommending fluocinolone acetonide, making it available for patients through the National Health Service (NHS).

Patients with pseudophakic eye who have undergone cataract will have greater access to fluocinolone acetonide (Iluvien, Alimera Sciences) for the treatment of chronic diabetic macular oedema (DME) that is considered refractive to available therapies. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has published a final guidance recommending fluocinolone acetonide, making it available for patients through the National Health Service (NHS).

This sustained-release treatment for vision impairment associated with chronic DME provides therapeutic effects for up to 36 months via an intravitreal implant that delivers sustained sub-microgram levels of fluocinolone acetonide.

"I am very pleased that pseudophakic patient with chronic DME will now have access through NHS to an effective, sustained-release therapy that could improve their sight and give them back some of the essential daily activities, such as driving and reading, that DME has taken away," said Winfried Amoaku, associate professor and consultant ophthalmologist, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust.

Alimera is currently in close communications with retinal specialists, hospital pharmacists, and commissioners throughout the United Kingdom to make fluocinolone acetonide implant available to suitable patients as quickly as possible.

"The NICE endorsement of [fluocinolone acetonide] in the United Kingdom is a significant milestone for NHS patients suffering from chronic DME," said Dan Myers, president and chief executive officer, Alimera. "These patients, insufficiently responsive to other options, now have a new treatment available to them. We hope the NHS commissioners will recognize this critical need and list [fluocinolone acetonide] on hospital formularies without delay," he concluded.

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