Nasal corticosteroids presents no ocular dangers in children

Article

Intermittent nasal corticosteroids do not cause ocular side effects such as cataract, glaucoma, corneal ectasia or abnormal tear function in children.

Intermittent nasal corticosteroids do not cause ocular side effects such as cataract, glaucoma, corneal ectasia or abnormal tear function in children, claims a study in Journal of Pediatric Ophthalmology & Strabismus.

A team managed by Dr Emin Ozayaka, Vakif Gureba Education and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey, investigated a study group of 150 children who were administered intermittent intranasal budesonide for over two years. There were also 90 newly diagnosed allergic rhinitis patients included in the study who were not administered any treatment (control group).

The factors that were compared between the two groups were central corneal thickness, Schirmer test results, visual acuity, intraocular pressure, cataract formation, keratometry and tear break-up time.

The average steroid dosage was 93.3 ± 7.0 µg per day and 42.2 ± 3.2 g being the total steroid used during treatment. Of the 150 children included in the study group cataract formation, corneal ectasia, ocular hypertension and glaucoma were not found. Also, there was no correlation between the study group patients and total steroid dosage.

Treating children suffering from allergic rhinitis with intermittent intranasal budesonide at an average dose of 100 µg does not cause ocular defects.

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