GMS+ implantation not effective for IOP control

September 2, 2013

Gold Micro Shunt Plus (GMS+) implantation is not an effective method for controlling IOP in glaucoma patients, according to a recent study in the journal BMC Ophthalmology.

Gold Micro Shunt Plus (GMS+) implantation is not an effective method for controlling IOP in glaucoma patients, according to a recent study in the journal BMC Ophthalmology.

Dr Arno Hueber et al., Department of Ophthalmology, University of Cologne, Germany, conducted a retrospective study on 31 eyes of 31 patients with severe glaucoma and uncontrolled IOP. Each patient underwent GMS+ implantation by means of a full-thickness scleral flap. The main outcome measures were surgical failure or success, determined by intraocular pressure and adverse effects.

Of the eyes included in the study, 30 met one of the failure criteria. Additional surgery was performed due to elevated IOP in 24 eyes and adverse effects in 2 eyes.

The remaining four eyes presented with an IOP reduction of less than 20% with comparable medication. The team explanted six GMS+’s because of IOP elevation in 2 eyes, rubeosis in 2 eyes and low-grade inflammation in 2 eyes.

GMS+ implantation is not effective for the control of IOP in glaucoma patients and the reason for the appearance of low grade inflammation and rubeosis iridis in 4 eyes remains unknown.

To read the abstract please click here.

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