Gamma-irradiated cornea allograft is effective for glaucoma surgery

June 27, 2013

Gamma-irradiated cornea allograft is safe and effect for use in glaucoma surgery, according to a paper published in the latest issue of the Journal of Glaucoma.

Gamma-irradiated cornea allograft is safe and effect for use in glaucoma surgery, according to a paper published in the latest issue of the Journal of Glaucoma.

A team managed by Dr Scott Lawrence, Department of Ophthalmology, University of North Carolina, North Carolina, USA, reviewed 10 eyes of 10 consecutive patients who underwent primary or secondary glaucoma surgery using sterile cornea allograft.

The allograft covered the primary glaucoma tube shunt in three patients, coverage and revised glaucoma tube shunt in five patients, tectonic support of a revised trabeculectomy flap in one patients and the coverage of subconjunctival prolene sutures after surgical iridoplasty in one patient.

During the follow-up period ten cases presented with stable and biocompatible allografts. This was due to maintained clarity of the corneal tissue, absence of clinical signs of immunologic rejection or ocular inflammation and integrity of the sterile cornea/conjunctiva over the graft.

There were no complications during the follow-up and the cosmetic findings were satisfactory. The benefits of sterile cornea allograft for the coverage of glaucoma tube shints include tissue transparency, resilience and ease of surgical use.

For the abstract please click here.