Clinical evaluation of laser treatment of the Crystalline lens for presbyopia in humans

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LensAR, Inc has issued a patent addressing methods for using laser technology to increase the flexibility of the ocular lens in order to both restore accommodation in presbyopia patients and allow easier removal of hardened lenses in cataract patients.

LensAR, Inc has issued a patent addressing methods for using laser technology to increase the flexibility of the ocular lens in order to both restore accommodation in presbyopia patients and allow easier removal of hardened lenses in cataract patients. LensAR says it believes that this novel intellectual property will provide the company with proprietary advantages for its LensAR Laser System in cataract surgery and the treatment of presbyopia. The issued patent is based on the groundbreaking work of the inventor Raymond I. Myers, O.D., clinical professor at the University of Missouri, St. Louis, and was in-licensed exclusively by LensAR at the time of the company's formation in 2004.

“Intellectual property is the foundation of LensAR. We believe this issued patent will be the first of many in the area of laser treatment of the ocular lens,” stated Randy Frey, LensAR's founder and chief executive officer. “While we appreciate that a significant amount of development work, along with FDA approval is still required to bring our LensAR Laser System to the market, we are fully committed to realizing our goal of ultimately enabling such valuable indications as capsulotomy, fragmentation, astigmatic and other corneal incisions for cataract surgery, as well as presbyopia treatment, all within one proprietary laser platform.”

LensAR is investigating the use of laser technology to increase the flexibility of the natural crystalline lens, potentially allowing patients to regain control of their lens shape. LensAR is the only company in the world to be clinically evaluating laser treatment of the crystalline lens for presbyopia in human subjects. An initial feasibility study, conducted under local health authority and ethics committee approved protocols in Mexico City, Mexico and Manila, Philippines is currently underway.

“This new patent is a major step forward for LensAR in the field of all laser cataract and refractive technology,” said Dr Ronald Krueger, medical director, Department of Refractive Surgery, Cole Eye Institute and professor of ophthalmology, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio. He is also a cofounder of LensAR. “It is important to note that the LensAR system was initially designed to correct presbyopia and early clinical data established that it not only softened the lens but also showed the potential to restore its natural flexibility and accommodative power. ”

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