Clear corneal phaco reduces IOP

January 15, 2007

Clear corneal phacoemulsification induces a small reduction in intraocular pressure (IOP), according to the results of a study published in the December 2006 issue of the Journal of Glaucoma.

Clear corneal phacoemulsification induces a small reduction in intraocular pressure (IOP), according to the results of a study published in the December 2006 issue of the Journal of Glaucoma.

Bradford Shingleton, MD and co-workers at Ophthalmic Consultants of Boston, USA, conducted a retrospective study of the long-term changes in IOP after clear corneal phacoemulsification. They examined 55 eyes of 48 patients with open-angle glaucoma, 44 eyes of 41 patients with suspected glaucoma and a control group of 59 eyes of 59 patients with no glaucoma. All patients completed a follow-up period of at least three years.

At three years follow-up, a mean IOP decrease of 1.4 mmHg was recorded among patients with glaucoma and glaucoma suspects. In the control group, there was a mean decrease of 1.7 mmHg. Most patients achieved IOPs equal or lower to their preoperative IOP without increasing the number of medications used.

At final follow-up, IOP remained significantly lower in all three groups. At a mean of five years, IOP had decreased by an average of 1.8 mmHg for glaucoma patients, 1.3 mmHg for glaucoma suspects and by 1.5 mmHg in the control group. Additionally, 76% of glaucoma patients, 79% of glaucoma suspects and 83% of the control group maintained IOPs of less or equal to the baseline without increasing the number of glaucoma medications.

The authors concluded that clear corneal phacoemulsification can induce a small but significant reduction in IOP that is sustained up to five years postoperatively.