B-MICS better than C-SICS

December 3, 2008

Biaxial microincision cataract surgery (B-MICS) is more successful than traditional cataract surgery in improving optical performance and reducing higher order aberrations, according to study results published in the December issue of the British Journal of Ophthalmology.

Biaxial microincision cataract surgery (B-MICS) is more successful than traditional cataract surgery in improving optical performance and reducing higher order aberrations, according to study results published in the December issue of the British Journal of Ophthalmology.

Professor PJ Pisella of the department of ophthalmology at the University Hospital of Bretonneau in Tours, France treated patients with bilateral cataract with B-MICS through a 1.7 mm clear corneal incision in one eye, and coaxial small-incision cataract surgery (C-SICS) through a 2.8 mm clear corneal incision in the opposite eye. All eyes were implanted with the Akreos MI60 AO intraocular lens (Bausch & Lomb), and the team compared corneal and ocular aberrations pre- and three-months postoperatively.

At the three-month follow-up point, eyes treated with B-MICS had lower values and reduced instances of trefoil, trefoil-like, higher-order aberrations, and corneal root mean square (RMS) when compared with C-SICS-treated eyes, although there were no differences between the two groups in terms of refraction, astigmatism and visual acuity values.

Thus the researchers concluded that B-MICS is a better surgical option than C-SICS for treating eyes with cataract, as it appears to reduce corneal aberrations and does not compromise postoperative optical performance.