Avastin useful adjunct for glaucoma therapy

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Avastin (bevacizumab) is a useful adjunct for the treatment of neovascular glaucoma, but it is too soon to say if it will have a long-term impact on glaucoma therapy.

Avastin (bevacizumab) is a useful adjunct for the treatment of neovascular glaucoma, but it is too soon to say if it will have a long-term impact on glaucoma therapy, according to Dr Stefan Scholl.

Alongside Professor Albert Augustin, Dr Scholl performed a study comprised of 25 glaucoma patients with neovascularization from diabetic retinopathy and retinal vein occlusion. Mean intraocular pressure (IOP) was 40.8 mmHg (patients receiving full topical medication). The patients received 2 mg Avastin intracamerally.

Following Avastin administration, slit lamp tests revealed some dramatic results, with regression of vessels as early as 48 hours after injection. After one week, mean IOP was 36.2mmHg, and after two weeks it was 22.8 mmHg. At three weeks it dropped to 15.9 mmHg.

"Absolutely no assumption can be made on the long-term impact of Avastin because topical medication might also be required as well as Avastin re-treatment," said Dr Scholl. "But it can be considered a useful adjunct to more stable treatments, such as photocoagulation."

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