Avastin gains further support

Sep 01, 2008

Avastin (bevacizumab) is effective in the arrest of angiogenesis at several stages, according to a study published online ahead of print by Acta Ophthalmologica.

Avastin (bevacizumab) is effective in the arrest of angiogenesis at several stages, according to a study published online ahead of print by Acta Ophthalmologica.

Raquel Soares MSc, PhD of the Department of Biochemistry in the Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, Portugal and colleagues examined the effect of bevacizumab on neovascularization at every stage throughout the process by injecting clinically established doses of bevacizumab into human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The team then monitored cell cytotoxicity, proliferation, apoptosis, migration and vessel assembly, both in vitro and in a rodent model.

The researchers found that the presence of bevacizumab did not induce cytotoxicity; proliferation, migration capacity and the assembly of capillary-like structures were significantly reduced, and the rate of apoptosis was significantly increased, following the injection of bevacizumab.

Thus the team concluded that bevacizumab intervenes at several stages of the angiogenic process to halt further progression, and that bevacizumab's indication as an anti-angiogenic is justified.

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