Whitestar can deal with even the hardest nuclei

Article

Microincision cataract surgery (MICS) with the Whitestar ICE and CASE systems (AMO) can be performed safely and effectively even in the hardest nuclei, according to a Turkish study.

Microincision cataract surgery (MICS) with the Whitestar ICE and CASE systems (AMO) can be performed safely and effectively even in the hardest nuclei, according to a Turkish study.

Hasan Oguzhan and colleagues from the Dr Sadi Konuk Education and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey performed MICS on 20 eyes (17 patients) using the Whitestar surgical system with ICE and CASE settings. Patients were selected according to their nucleus hardness (grade 3 – 4) and were examined for intraoperative complications, mean phaco time, total phaco %, effective phaco time (EPT), endothelial cell loss, postoperative corneal oedema and mean uncorrected and best corrected visual acuity.

The mean phaco time, total phaco % and EPT were one minute 24 seconds, 4.8% and 3.22 seconds, respectively. The mean preoperative and postoperative endothelial cell counts and percentage endothelial cell loss were 2 376, 2 253, and 5.2%, respectively. The mean early (within three days) postoperative uncorrected visual acuity and late postoperative best corrected visual acuity were 0.6 and 0.9 on the Snellen chart, respectively. There were no complications and surgery was performed safely in even the hardest nuclei.

It was the conclusion of the authors that bimanual MICS using the Whitestar ICE and CASE systems is both safe and effective even in the hardest nuclei.

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