VEGF levels in Tenon tissue linked to glaucoma surgery outcomes

July 5, 2012

Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels in the Tenon tissue and final IOP is significantly correlated to 1-year surgical outcomes of glaucoma surgery in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG)

Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels in the Tenon tissue and final IOP is significantly correlated to 1-year surgical outcomes of glaucoma surgery in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), claims an investigation in the Archives of Ophthalmology.

A group managed by Dr Hae-Young Lopilly Park, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Seoul St Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, determined the levels of VEGF in the aqueous humour and the Tenon tissue in 19 POAG patients due to undergo glaucoma surgery. The study also included 17 control subjects due to undergo cataract surgery.

A 4x4 mm square of Tenon tissue was cut from the eye, along with the collection of 0.1 ml of aqueous humour. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to analyse VEGF concentrations. Spearman correlation and regression analysis were conducted to evaluate the connection with VEGF levels and the clinical characteristics/postoperative IOP.

In POAG patients the VEGF in Tenon tissue was significantly increased, compared to the control group. Preoperative IOP was strongly related to the VEGF levels in Tenon tissue in both the univariate and the multivariate.