Topical diclofenac offers no extra benefit for post-PRK pain

Article

Oral diclofenac sufficiently manages pain after photorefractive keratectomy (PRK), and adding topical diclofenac 0.1% drops to a post-PRK oral diclofenac regimen does not add any additional pain-control benefit, according to recent research.

Oral diclofenac sufficiently manages pain after photorefractive keratectomy (PRK), and adding topical diclofenac 0.1% drops to a post-PRK oral diclofenac regimen does not add any additional pain-control benefit, according to research conducted in Mashhad and Tehran, Iran, and reported in Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology.

The researchers studied 68 patients in a prospective, randomized, double-masked clinical trial. All of the patients were undergoing bilateral PRK for myopic correction.

Prior to their PRK procedures, all of the patients received two 100 mg doses of extended-release oral diclofenac. The patients were then randomized into two postoperative groups. One group received topical diclofenac 0.1% drops, 1 drop 2 hours preoperatively, and 1 drop 4 times each day for 3 days postoperatively. The other group received artificial tears.

On day 2 post-surgery, there was no statistically significant difference in patient-evaluated pain level, photophobia, or functional activity between the two groups. However, the group that received the artificial tears had significantly higher eyelid oedema and conjunctival injection levels than the group that received the diclofenac drops.

The researchers conclude that although the addition of topical diclofenac to a post-PRK pain regimen of oral diclofenac diminished local signs such as eyelid oedema and conjunctival injection, it did not help to alleviate post PRK-pain.

To view an abstract of the study, click here.

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