Syringe-based portable vitrectomy device is safe for vitreoretinal diseases

November 1, 2011

The Intrector syringe-based vitrectomy device has similar comfortable sustainable syringe pull forces, vacuum levels and liquid aspiration rates as commercially available systems.

The Intrector syringe-based vitrectomy device has similar comfortable sustainable syringe pull forces, vacuum levels and liquid aspiration rates as commercially available systems, states an experiment published in Retina.

Dr John Pitcher et al., Jules Stein Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California, USA, compared the fluidic properties of the Intrector device with a number of other commercially available vitrectomy systems. The study was compiled in order to assess the safety and efficacy for the treatment of vitreoretinal diseases.

A spring-loaded digital scale was used to measure the mean operator comfortable sustainable syringe plunger pull force. A pressure transducer was used to record pulling forces and vacuum levels for syringes of varying volumes. This included volumes in measurements of 3, 5 and 10 ml. A cutter with a rate of 600 cuts per minute was used to determine the flow rates of water and egg whites. These were measured in the off position with the port open. The infusion flow of water was measured using a 1 ml syringe.

The mean vacuum level was 135.9 mm Hg when using the 3 ml syringe with a 0.91 kg pull force. Additionally, the mean cutter-on flow rates of egg white and water were 0.5 ml per minute and 1.9 ml per minute, respectively. The mean plunger pull force among operators was recorded as 0.80 kg.

Overall, larger-bore syringes generated lower vacuum levels and liquid flow rates. The fluidic parameters of the Intrector vitrectomy device indicate similar syringe pull forces, vacuum levels and liquid aspiration rates to commercially available devices.