Study shows wide-field imaging can be factor in detecting AMD-related changes in the retinal periphery

June 11, 2010

Retinal imaging company, Optos Plc having made a return to profitability is taking its Optomap Retinal Exam to the ophthalmology community and had a strong presence at this year?s WOC in Berlin.

Retinal imaging company, Optos Plc having made a return to profitability is taking its Optomap Retinal Exam to the ophthalmology community and had a strong presence at this year’s WOC in Berlin.

Positive results from two clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of the optomap ultra-widefield retinal scan have demonstrated the importance of examining the periphery of the retina.

The Reykjavik Eye Study was the first study to employ systematic analysis of digital retinal images for a genetically well-characterised population based study. There were 573 participants (aged 72 and older) involved in taking two retinal images, the first using conventional digital fundus images and the second using Optos P200C AF device that generates an ultra-wide field of 200 degrees colour and auto-fluorescence images.

The investigators, headed by Dr Tundo Peto of Moorfields Hospital found that 56% of participants had symptoms on the periphery of the retina with features that are normally associated with AMD. Seven participants had changes on the periphery without end-stage disease in the macula. No-one with end-stage disease in the macula had a normal retinal periphery.

Dr Peto said: “With the optomap we now have the ability to visualise the peripheral retina at the same time that we see the macular area. Potentially this gives us an unprecedented opportunity to evaluate the contribution of the peripheral changes to age related diseases.”

Optos CEO, Roy Davis, commented: “We are delighted to be working with leading academic researchers in both Europe and North America. These studies further increase our belief in the value of the optomap digital eye examination in providing an accurate diagnosis of diseases and pathologies that present in the retina. Furthermore, these studies make clear the need to conduct further research into both the periphery and the centre of the retina.”