Micropulse diode TSCPC consistently lowers IOP

Article

Micropulse diode transscleral cyclophotocoagulation (TSCPC) lowers IOP consistently, predictably, and with minimal ocular complications, according to a recently published study.

Micropulse diode transscleral cyclophotocoagulation (TSCPC) lowers IOP consistently, predictably, and with minimal ocular complications, according to a study recently published in Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology.

In a randomized, comparative, explorative study, researchers from London and Singapore randomly assigned 48 hospital patients who had refractory, end-stage glaucoma to undergo diode TSCPC in micropulse mode or in continuous mode. Researchers monitored IOP, visual acuity (VA), number of medications taken and whether re-treatment was necessary. Complications included a decline in VA, prolonged anterior chamber inflammation, phthisis bulbi, scleral thinning and ocular pain.

After 12 months, a primary outcome - IOP between 6 and 21 mmHg - was noted in 75% of study participants whose cyclophotocoagulation was performed in micropulse mode and 29% who received continuous mode. Another primary outcome was a minimum 30% reduction with or without anti-glaucoma medications after 18 months. At this point in the study, this primary outcome was seen in 52% of micropulse mode patients and 30% of continuous mode participants, respectively.

Mean IOP was reduced by 45% in both groups from a baseline of 36.5 mmHg and 35.0 mmHg after a range of 16 to 19 months of follow-up. The investigators did not see significant difference in the re-treatment rates or in the number of IOP-lowering medications taken. The ocular complication rate was higher in the eyes treated in continuous wave mode.

To read an abstract of the study, click here.

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