German Society of Ophthalmology

May 1, 2006

The DOG (Deutsche Ophthalmologische Gesellschaft) was founded in 1857 when a group of like-minded ophthalmologists, brought together by Albrecht von Greafe, met in Heidelberg to discuss the latest developments in their profession. This first meeting was organized to take place a few days before the international ophthalmology conference in Brussels with the idea that they would then travel on together to attend. In all, twelve people arrived in Heidleberg, where discussion topics ranged from the use of compression bandages to glaucoma treatment. It was considered such a success that they agreed to meet again the following year.

The DOG (Deutsche Ophthalmologische Gesellschaft) was founded in 1857 when a group of like-minded ophthalmologists, brought together by Albrecht von Greafe, met in Heidelberg to discuss the latest developments in their profession. This first meeting was organized to take place a few days before the international ophthalmology conference in Brussels with the idea that they would then travel on together to attend. In all, twelve people arrived in Heidleberg, where discussion topics ranged from the use of compression bandages to glaucoma treatment. It was considered such a success that they agreed to meet again the following year.

Titled "Ophthalmology in the Aging Society", the meeting, to be held in Berlin, Germany from September 21-24, will be focusing on the challenges facing ophthalmologists in the current climate. Topics for discussion will include the screening of age-related diseases, age-adapted therapy, the ageing of the visual system versus disease and the epidemiology of age-related diseases. Furthermore, the meeting will also include courses on how to write a successful grant proposal, preparing scientific papers and preparing a successful scientific presentation. Career planning and advice will also be available for young scientists attending the meeting.

"I have made it my goal to mould the society into one that has a stronger scientific appearance and identity," says society President Professor Norbert Pfeiffer.

To learn more about DOG, please go to http://www.dog.org/

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