FTMHs more easily found with high-density radial scans

February 14, 2014

High-density radial scanning provides superior detection of small full-thickness macular holes (FTMHs) compared with standard raster volume scanning, according to recent data.

High-density radial scanning provides superior detection of small full-thickness macular holes (FTMHs) compared with standard raster volume scanning, according to results from a study published in the American Journal of Ophthalmology.

Researchers conducted this retrospective cross-sectional analysis in 25 eyes from 24 patients with FTMHs imaged using the Heidelberg Spectralis HRA+OCT with the standard (61-line) raster volume and a 24-line radial pattern. A 6-line radial scan pattern was also extrapolated from the higher density radial pattern. Missed hole rates and the proportion of individual B-scans that showed a full-thickness defect were compared for all three scan patterns. Qualitative and quantitative hole parameters were also evaluated in order to identify factors that were associated with missed holes.

Full-thickness defects were missed substantially more frequently when standard raster volume and 6-line radial scanning compared to 24-line radial scanning (20% vs 12.0% vs 0%, respectively). Full-thickness detection indices were significantly higher for both radial scan patterns when compared to rater scanning (P

High density radial scanning was found to be superior. According to the authors of this study, "This finding may be attributable to the greater foveolar scan density attained with radial scan patterns. Failure to utilize radial scanning in the setting of suspected macular holes may lead to a delay in surgical treatment with attendant worse anatomic and visual outcomes."

To access the abstract of this study, click here.