Controlling IOP with SLT and latanoprost

January 14, 2009

Both selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) and latanoprost are effective at controlling the level and fluctuation of intraocular pressure (IOP), according to a study published online ahead of print by the British Journal of Ophthalmology.

Both selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) and latanoprost are effective at controlling the level and fluctuation of intraocular pressure (IOP), according to a study published online ahead of print by the British Journal of Ophthalmology.

Dr Madhu Mahesh Nagar of Clayton Eye Centre, UK and colleagues treated open-angle glaucoma (OAG) and ocular hypertension (OH) patients (n=40) randomly with either SLT or latanoprost, and measured IOP values at day 3, week 1, month 1 and month 4–6 postoperatively. The team defined IOP control success as a reduction of 20% over preoperative values. The team also measured tension curves before and 4–6 months after treatment, with success defined as a 50% reduction in fluctuation.

Patients treated with SLT experienced a mean IOP decrease of 4.7 mmHg, with a similar level of reduction experienced by latanoprost-treated patients; 75% of SLT-treated patients and 73% of latanoprost-treated patients achieved a successful level of IOP reduction. In terms of reducing fluctuation, latanoprost was the more effective treatment although both methods achieved a statistically significant reduction: latanoprost was successful in 83% of cases and SLT was successful in 50% of cases.

The researchers concluded that both SLT and latanoprost are effective at controlling IOP and reducing fluctuation, both with their own benefits: latanoprost is the more successful at reducing IOP fluctuation whereas SLT is a single interventional treatment, which does not require follow-up.