Combigan may induce allergies

March 31, 2007

Combigan (brimonidine 0.2%/timolol 0.5%) can cause allergic symptoms in significant numbers of patients, according to Dr Subash and co-workers from Kingston Hospital, UK.

Combigan (brimonidine 0.2%/timolol 0.5%) can cause allergic symptoms in significant numbers of patients, according to Dr Subash and co-workers from Kingston Hospital, UK.

Thirty-two patients who began Combigan therapy between April 2005 and February 2006 were enrolled to an open-label, prospective, six-month surveillance study. All patients were sent a patient satisfaction questionnaire.

After a mean follow-up of 23.1 weeks, a mean reduction in IOP of 5.5 mmHg was achieved. Greatest IOP lowering was seen in patients who switched from timolol alone and from dorzolamide/timolol combinations. Side effects that resulted in discontinuation of Combigan were tachypnoea (9.4%) and allergic conjunctivitis (34.4%). Patients who did not develop adverse side effects were satisfied with Combigan.

Dr Subash concluded that, although Combigan offers good IOP lowering and is generally safe, a substantial number of patients taking the therapy will develop allergic symptoms.