Choroidal drainage good option for acute angle closure

February 13, 2008

Choroidal drainage can be a safe and effective interventional procedure for patients presenting with acute angle closure secondary to Topiramate toxicity.

Choroidal drainage can be a safe and effective interventional procedure for patients presenting with acute angle closure secondary to Topiramate toxicity, according to a case report published in the December 2007 issue of the Journal of Glaucoma.

Topiramate is an anti-convulsant drug administered to treat certain types of seizures in patients with epilepsy.

Rajul Parikh and co-workers from the Christian Medical College, Vellore and the LV Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India reported the role of choroidal drainage in a patient with acute bilateral angle closure secondary to cilio-choroidal effusion with Topiramate.

Two-weeks after commencing Topiramate for the management of epilepsy, the patient developed acute bilateral angle closure secondary to cilio-choroidal effusion with lenticulo-corneal touches for which choroidal drainage was performed.

Following the procedure, the anterior chamber deepened, the corneal oedema resolved, choroidals began to resolve and intraocular pressure was controlled without medication. The researchers therefore concluded that, in patients presenting with acute angle closure secondary to Topiramate toxicity, choroidal drainage is a safe and effective interventional procedure.