CCT greater in the hypertensive

January 15, 2007

Greater central corneal thickness (CCT) measurements are observed in those with ocular hypertension than in those without, according to a report published online ahead of publication in Ophthalmology.

Greater central corneal thickness (CCT) measurements are observed in those with ocular hypertension than in those without, according to a report published online ahead of publication in Ophthalmology.

Researchers involved in the European Glaucoma Prevention Study Group (EGPS), conducted a randomized, double-masked, controlled, observational clinical trial of 854 of the patients enrolled in EGPS. A total of 429 patients were treated with dorzolamide and 425 received a placebo. CCT thickness was measured by ultrasound pachymetry and measurements were taken in the morning before intraocular pressure (IOP). Five measurements were taken from each eye of each patient within five minutes of application of anaesthetic eye drops.

Results showed that mean CCT was 572.6±37.4 µm (range 458.5 – 695.6 µm). CCT was higher in younger patients, male patients and diabetic patients. Mean CCT measurements for the dorzolamide patients was recorded at 574.2±38.48 µm (range 458.5 – 695.6 µm) and for the placebo patients, 571.0±36.21 µm (rage 469.7 – 690.1 µm). CCT did not correlate with refraction, baseline IOP or systemic hypertension.

The researchers found that CCT measurements for those with ocular hypertension are higher than for those without the condition.