Avastin offers hope to CME sufferers

February 13, 2008

Intravitreal bevacizumab (Avastin; Genentech) appears to be a safe and effective treatment in the management of refractory inflammatory cystoid macular oedema.

Intravitreal bevacizumab (Avastin; Genentech) appears to be a safe and effective treatment in the management of refractory inflammatory cystoid macular oedema (CME), according to a report published in the January issue of Retina.

Friederike Mackensen from the University of Heidelberg and colleagues from the University of Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg, Germany reviewed 11 eyes of 10 patients with persistent CME who subsequently had been treated with intravitreous bevacizumab 1.25 or 2.5 mg. Improvement was gauged by visual acuity (VA) gain ≥2 lines and central retinal thickness reduction, as observed by optical coherence tomography (OCT).

Reductions in central retinal thickness were observed as early as two weeks, with a mean foveal thickness reduction of 127.2 µm at four-weeks. Concurrent improvement in VA was observed in four of the 10 subjects and was unchanged in others. Four patients received two injections and five patients received three injections. Except for progression of cataract in one eye, no ocular or systemic adverse events were recorded.

The researchers believe that intravitreal bevacizumab could offer a safe and effective treatment for the management of refractory inflammatory CME, despite the effect being transient.